Events List for the Academic Year

Event Time: Wednesday, July 7, 2021 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-07-07T11:00:00 2021-07-07T12:00:00 Quantization of Gravity in the Black Hole Background Event Information: We perform covariant quantization of Einstein gravity in spherical harmonic basis in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We use Regge-Wheeler gauge for modes with l>=2, and propose the gauge for l<2 modes. We find that Faddeev-Popov ghosts are absent for l>=2 and for l<2 they have instantaneous propagators in Schwarzschild coordinates, like in Coulomb gauge in QCD. We further perform a canonical quantization of gravity in this gauge and establish that the Hamiltonian at the quadratic level is unitary and ghost-free. The canonical degrees of freedom are associated with Zerilli-Moncrief and Cunningham-Price-Moncrief functions. The l<2 part of the Hamiltonian vanishes. This quantization with the unitary Hamiltonian for gravity is valid also in Minkowski space in spherical coordinates. Event Location: Connect via Zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, July 7, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-07-07T10:00:00 2021-07-07T11:00:00 Looking for observational signatures of feedback from active galactic nuclei Event Information: Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to be key in shaping the life-cycle of host galaxies. AGN inject a significant amount of energy into the surrounding interstellar medium and launch gaseous winds. They are therefore able to potentially suppress or inhibit future star formation in their hosts. An ideal cosmic laboratory to study how AGN regulate galaxy growth is the so-called cosmic noon (z~2), i.e. the peak of AGN accretion activity when their energy output is overall maximized. In this talk I will describe our recent efforts to systematically characterize the impact of AGN on star formation in galaxies at cosmic noon. To this aim, we are exploiting integral field spectroscopy data obtained with SINFONI and ALMA observations of the ionized and molecular gas as well as dust continuum. "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Monday, July 5, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-07-05T15:00:00 2021-07-05T16:00:00 Multi-wavelength Explorations of Evolved Stars and Exoplanets Event Information: Multi-wavelength observations, from the ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR) and beyond, are powerful tools for exploring evolved stars and characterizing exoplanets. Cool evolved stars contribute significantly to the interstellar medium (ISM) enrichment, via gas and dust produced in their atmospheres. Yet, a thorough understanding of their mass loss mechanism(s) remains challenging. Exploring cool evolved stars' upper layers is thus essential to unraveling their mass loss history and its influence on the composition of the ISM and Galactic ecology. But how can we 'see through' the biggest stars in the Universe?  In this talk, I will describe investigations tying together analyses of HST high-resolution UV spectra, and VLT optical/IR interferometric observations and imaging of evolved stars, which enabled tight constraints on their mass loss, atmospheric structure and dynamics, radial extension, and evolutionary stages. I will also present groundbreaking results from application of machine learning algorithms to TESS light curves data for detecting new exoplanets, and discuss new opportunities to extend science using next-generation ground-base and space telescopes such as the JWST. Finally, I will describe three mission concepts: SI-LP, FITE, CUµLUS, exciting visionary missions that will significantly advance our knowledge, from the UV into the IR, of evolved stars' interiors and circumstellar envelopes, and of exoplanets.  Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Thursday, July 1, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Location:
None
Add to Calendar 2021-07-01T16:00:00 2021-07-01T17:00:00 Canada Day! Event Information: It's Canada Day and we're not having a Departmental Colloquium! Event Location: None
Event Time: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-30T11:00:00 2021-06-30T12:00:00 How do we design the future of gravitational wave astrophysics? Event Information: We are living in an astrophysics transformation because decades ago technologists started to design and build our future. They figured out that we could convert the dynamic motion of space-time into a detectable signal and developed technology to create the Advanced Gravitational-wave detector network. In the last five years, we swiftly moved from the first-ever direct detection into catalogs of 10s of new sources. These observations enable direct measurements of General Relativity's robustness, independent cosmological tracers, and how we understand the environments stars live and die. We are starting to see a glimmer of what is on our horizon. In this presentation, I will discuss how we are designing the future of gravitational wave astrophysics to ensure the field's longevity. I will share where we are within the generations of gravitational wave detector development, including the next ambitious project, Cosmic Explorer and how you can join the Cosmic Explorer community. I will describe how I am bringing the world of metamaterials into gravitational wave instrumentation and the potential for improving our detector’s sensitivity. Event Location: Connect via Zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-06-30T10:00:00 2021-06-30T11:00:00 The evolution of cold accretion flows in the CGM of massive galaxies and proto-clusters at z>2 Event Information: Massive star-forming galaxies and proto-clusters at high redshift, z>2, are thought to be fed by narrow streams of cold, ~10^4K, gas from cosmic web filaments. However, the interaction of these cold streams with the ambient hot CGM is poorly understood. In particular, the observational signatures of this interaction and of cold streams more broadly, the thermal and morphological state of the gas that eventually reaches the central galaxy, and its effect on galaxy evolution, are all open questions. I will present the latest results from a systematic study of this interaction, using a combination of analytic models, idealized high-resolution numerical simulations, and cosmological simulations. We study the effects of hydrodynamics, radiative cooling, self-gravity, the halo potential, and magnetic fields, separately and together, in order to gain insight into stream evolution in different limits. We find that while hydrodynamic instabilities can disrupt streams in the CGM, these are stabilized by cooling, gravity, and MHD. Radiative cooling in the turbulent mixing layer between the stream and the CGM is observable in Lyman alpha, and can explain several observed Lyman alpha blobs. Self-gravity in the streams can lead to star-formation in the CGM at redshifts z>~4. MHD effects lead to magnetically dominated interface regions which appear out of thermal pressure equilibrium and impact the phase structure of the high-z CGM. "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Monday, June 28, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-28T15:00:00 2021-06-28T16:00:00 The first CHIME/FRB catalogue and beyond Event Information: The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity-Mapping Experiment (CHIME) opens a whole new window on the Universe and this new catalogue of more than 500 fast radio bursts (FRBs) provides a treasure trove of data for understaning FRBs. For the first time, we can study a population of FRBs from a single telescope. We see that they come from all over the sky and across the Universe, from very nearby galaxies to more than halfway back to the Big Bang. We also see that there may be more than one type of FRB. We are able to obtain each burst's "fingerprint", and the repeating sources have different fingerprints from the FRBs that have only been seen once. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Thursday, June 24, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-24T16:00:00 2021-06-24T17:00:00 Measuring the Largest Structures in the Universe with the Smallest Telescopes in Space Event Information: Observational astrophysics is often driven by the desire for ever increasing angular resolution, which has resulted in larger and more expensive telescopes with time. However, telescopes with very small apertures can sometimes perform cosmological measurements as important as their larger siblings. In this talk, I will present several examples of small aperture, space-based experiments providing unique views of the large scale structure of the Universe as traced at optical and infrared wavelengths.  I will discuss recent results from the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) that has successfully measured the amplitude of the near-IR background fluctuations on arcminute scales, and our work using the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on New Horizons to measure the cosmic optical background.  Looking forward, missions like the CIBER-2 sounding rocket and SPHEREx, a mid-class NASA Explorer mission designed to probe the inflationary history of the Universe and the evolution of galaxies, are expected to generate important new results in the next 5 years. Dr. Zemcov's primary research focus is experimental astrophysics and cosmology, particularly the development of instruments and data analysis methods for a variety of platforms, including ground-based, sub-orbital rockets, and orbital observatories.  He is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Physics & Astronomy and the Center for Detectors at the Rochester Institute of Technology and an Affiliate Scientist at Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  Prior to coming to RIT in 2015, Dr. Zemcov was a Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at the California Institute of Technology and a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow. He received his PhD from Cardiff University, Wales in 2006 and his BSc from the University of British Columbia in 2003. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, June 23, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-06-23T10:00:00 2021-06-23T11:00:00 The Search for Ionizing Radiation at High Redshift Event Information: /*-->*/ Determining the contribution of galaxies to the reionization of the universe is a fundamental goal for studies of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and galaxy formation and evolution. A direct measurement of ionizing Lyman-continuum radiation escaping from galaxies is not possible at the epoch of reionization, due to the high optical depth of the IGM, and therefore observations of this process at slightly lower redshift are crucial for understanding what happens at z>6. For the past several years, we have been attempting direct imaging and spectroscopic observations of escaping ionizing radiation at z~3, using both ground-based and HST data. These observations have uncovered many possible sources of Lyman continuum radiation, but also reveal the challenges associated with low-redshift contamination. We highlight the current state of the field and promising upcoming methods for determining f_esc, the escape fraction of ionizing radiation. "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Friday, June 18, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-06-18T10:00:00 2021-06-18T11:00:00 The hidden cold circumgalactic medium Event Information: The circumgalactic medium (CGM) represents the boundary between the interstellar medium and the cosmic web, and its properties are directly shaped by the baryon cycle in galaxies. The CGM was traditionally believed to consist mostly of warm and hot gas, but recent breakthroughs have presented a new scenario according to which an important fraction of its mass may reside in an "hidden" cold atomic and molecular phase. This would have major implications for galaxy formation and evolution theories, because it would imply that the CGM entrains dense gas that is readily available for star formation. "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Thursday, June 17, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-17T16:00:00 2021-06-17T17:00:00 The new SI and fundamental constants Event Information: The International System of Units (SI) underwent a revolutionary change on May 20, 2019. In October 2017, the International Committee on Weights and Measures met at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris and recommended a new definition of the SI such that a particular set of constants would have certain values when expressed in the new SI units. In particular, the SI is now defined by the statement: The International System of Units, the SI, is the system of units in which the unperturbed ground state hyperfine splitting frequency of the caesium 133 atom nu_Cs is 9 192 631 770 Hz, the speed of light in vacuum c is 299 792 458 m/s, the Planck constant h is 6.626 070 15 x 10^-34 J/Hz, the elementary charge e is 1.602 176 634 x 10^-19 C, the Boltzmann constant k is 1.380 649 x 10^-23 J/K, the Avogadro constant N_A is 6.022 140 76 x 10^23 mol^-1, the luminous efficacy K_cd of monochromatic radiation of frequency 540 x 10^12 hertz is 683 lm/W. The numerical values of the constants were determined by a special CODATA adjustment of the values of the constants using data in papers that were accepted for publication by July 1, 2017. The Convention of the Meter (Convention du Metre), a treaty that species international agreement on how units are defined, was established in 1875 with 17 nations initially signing on, including the US. The SI, established within the treaty in 1960, is more recent and continues to evolve. Currently, the treaty is agreed to by fifty-eight Member States, including all the major industrialized countries. Even though a majority of people in the US still use units such as inches and pounds, the official standards for these units are based on the SI units. The redefinition has had a signicant impact on the fundamental constants when expressed in SI units. Not only are the defining constants exact, but many others are now also exact, and still others have considerably reduced uncertainties. This reflects a shift from macroscopic measurement standards to quantum based standards. This talk will describe the new SI, review reasons for the change, and show how units can be based on assigned values of certain physical constants. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Monday, June 14, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-14T15:00:00 2021-06-14T16:00:00 Constraining the Timescales of Galaxy Evolution using Observations and Simulations Event Information: A diverse range of physical processes are responsible for regulating star formation across galaxies. Understanding their relative contributions to galaxy growth and quenching at different epochs is one of the key questions in galaxy evolution today. Since the processes driving galaxy growth, quenching and morphological transformations are thought to have characteristic timescales, studying the strength of stochastic star formation rate (SFR) fluctuations on these timescales allows us to disentangle their relative contributions for a population of galaxies. In this talk, I will give a brief summary of current work focusing on (i) establishing a formalism to study the stochasticity of star formation at a given time-scale and analyzing a variety of cosmological galaxy evolution simulations using this formalism, and (ii) observational methods of reconstructing star formation histories, which yield constraints on the time-scales of galaxy growth, morphological transformations, and quenching. Taken together, simulations and observations leverage predictive power against observational constraints, allowing us to develop a fuller picture of how galaxies evolve over time. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Thursday, June 10, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-10T16:00:00 2021-06-10T17:00:00 Modelling COVID-19 variants and vaccination Event Information: COVID-19 spreads quickly, with different regions experiencing waves of infections at different times. While the initial waves reflected changes in social behaviour, the most recent waves in Canada and elsewhere were influenced by variants and vaccination. This talk introduces basic epidemic modelling and presents analyses of data from BC and around the world that show how variants and vaccination affected the past and will shape the future of the pandemic. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-06-09T10:00:00 2021-06-09T11:00:00 AGN emission line diagnostic diagrams Event Information: TBA "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Monday, June 7, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Connect via zoom
Add to Calendar 2021-06-07T15:00:00 2021-06-07T16:00:00 Biogenic Worlds: From atmospheric HCN production to the building blocks of RNA in warm little ponds Event Information: What is the origin of the building blocks of life on early Earth? Is it necessary that they were delivered by meteorites or interplanetary dust? Or was early Earth "biogenic," and could produce key biomolecules on its own? An atmosphere rich in HCN is a distinguishing feature of what we term biogenic worlds. HCN is a key species produced in Miller-Urey electric discharge experiments simulating lightning-based chemistry in the primordial atmosphere. HCN reacts in water to form nucleobases and ribose, the building blocks of RNA, and amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. To determine whether early Earth was biogenic, we develop a self-consistent chemical kinetic model for the production and rainout of HCN in the early atmosphere, and couple it to a comprehensive model of warm little ponds to compute the in situ production of the building blocks of RNA. We model two epochs of the Hadean eon, at 4.4 Gya (giga-years ago) and 4.0 Gya, which differ in composition, luminosity, UV intensity, and impact bombardment rate. At 4.4 Gya, UV intensity was high due to the active newly formed Sun, and asteroids and comets were bombarding the planet at an overwhelming rate of 1x1015 kg/yr. Impact degassing at this time produced a reducing, H2-dominant atmosphere. At 4.0 Gya, the atmosphere was depleted in hydrogen due to escape from the upper atmosphere, and volcanic outgassing led to an oxidizing CO2-dominant world. The reducing models at 4.4 Ga lead to RNA building block production in ponds that is comparable in concentration to what would result from meteoritic delivery (ppm-range). Unlike the RNA building blocks delivered to ponds by meteorites, which survive for less than a few years, the concentrations produced in situ are maintained indefinitely due to the steady influx of HCN from the troposphere. The oxidizing models at 4.0 Ga lead to substantially lower RNA building block concentrations (ppq-range). These results suggest that early Earth was biogenic at 4.4 Ga, and transitioned out of this phase sometime before 4.0 Ga. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Thursday, June 3, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Event Location:
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Add to Calendar 2021-06-03T16:00:00 2021-06-03T17:00:00 Directed Aging: Using Memory and Nature's Greed as a New Principle for Materials Design Event Information: It is a well-known and indisputable fact that materials age and deform over time, which often leads to detrimental degradation.  In contrast to this view, I will seek to embrace aging and develop it as a methodology to create desired and novel functionality in matter. The central idea is that a material retains a memory of the external stimuli to which it was exposed during its preparation history and, in reaction to those applied cues, can be directed to evolve desired behaviors not easily found otherwise. “Directed aging” thus has the potential to become a general, new and unconventional methodology for creating material function; it stands in direct juxtaposition to the normal paradigm where materials are designed for specific functions.  Just as stem cells evolve differently depending on the environment to which they are exposed, we envisage materials that develop new types of response upon exposure to different cues.  We are left with the question: How far can this vision be pushed to generate broad classes of materials with desired functionality?  Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, June 2, 2021 | 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Event Location:
Online
Add to Calendar 2021-06-02T10:00:00 2021-06-02T11:00:00 Science of VLTI/GRAVITY near-infrared interferometer and the studies of luminous AGNs Event Information: TBA "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online
Event Time: Monday, May 31, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Connect via zoom
Add to Calendar 2021-05-31T15:00:00 2021-05-31T16:00:00 Spin state and moment of inertia of Venus Event Information: Earth-based radar observations in 2006–2020 enabled the first measurement of the spin precession rate and moment of inertia of Venus.  The observations also showed that the spin period of the solid planet changes by tens of minutes.  The length-of-day variations are due to variations in atmospheric angular momentum transferred to the solid planet.  Some of the variations appear to follow the diurnal cycle. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Thursday, May 27, 2021 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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Add to Calendar 2021-05-27T16:00:00 2021-05-27T17:00:00 Adventures of a lapsed physicist: from solid state physics to Covid-19 vaccines Event Information: I graduated from the UBC Physics Department with a PhD in solid state physics in 1972. In this talk I will relate an improbable journey from ESR studies of phosphorus-doped silicon at 4°K to enabling the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine. The story begins with a move to the Biochemistry Department at Oxford University as a Postdoctoral Fellow to use NMR to study the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes. This required the use of simplified “model membrane” vesicular systems consisting of well-defined lipid species. I soon became interested in the potential of these model membranes as drug delivery vehicles and, on my return to UBC in 1978, focused most of my efforts in this area. Initial work led to three lipid nanoparticle (LNP) systems containing cancer drugs that were approved by the FDA and EMA. This success led to work beginning in the late 1990s to deliver nucleic acid-based drugs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) for gene silencing and mRNA for gene expression. Some 20 years later, these efforts resulted in LNP systems that could deliver encapsulated mRNA to the interior of target cells in vivo. Through a series of rather serendipitous events these LNP systems now enable the mRNA coding for the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein in the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine to be delivered into muscle and immune cells, enabling vaccine potency. The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is playing a major role in quelling the global pandemic. Event Location: Connect via zoom
Event Time: Wednesday, May 26, 2021 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Event Location:
Zoom link in description
Add to Calendar 2021-05-26T15:00:00 2021-05-26T16:00:00 Special CM Seminar - Magic behavior of low-dimensional nanostructures Event Information: https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66400573212?pwd=U2txNjdnazcrMjJ4L2FZMWtXOFc2dz09 Meeting ID: 664 0057 3212 Passcode: 139139 Magic behavior of low-dimensional nanostructures David Tománek - Physics and Astronomy Dept., Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract: Like in a magic trick, atomically thin layers of specific materials can be mixed and stacked in a well-defined way. Due to the inter-layer interaction and charge transfer, the heterostructure may exhibit sometimes unexpected behavior. This occurs in the case of elemental boron, which is notorious for a large number of stable allotropes not only in 3D bulk, but also in 2D. We find that a previously unknown 2D ε–B allotrope converts stepwise to a stable honeycomb structure when doped with electrons, resembling a magic conversion of boron to carbon atoms that carry one more valence electron [1]. As seen in Fig. 1(b), sufficient extra charge to initiate this transition may be provided when 2D boron is brought into contact with the 2D electride Ca2N. A different apparent example of magic involves the previously overlooked twist degree of freedom in 2D structures like bilayer graphene, which changes the Moiré pattern, as shown in the left panel of Fig. 1(c). Recent theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that the electronic structure near the Fermi level of twisted bilayer graphene (TBLG) depends extremely sensitively on the twist angle θ. Near the magic angle value θm≈1.08°, a flat band emerges at EF, separated from conduction and valence states by energy gaps. This unexpected behaviour likely provides valuable insight into electron correlation and superconductivity in 2D systems. Even though TBLG and related non-periodic structures can not be treated by standard band structure theory, their electronic structure can be interpreted quantitatively using a parameterized model [2] that can be simply extended to consider also other deformations including shear [3]. This study was partly supported by the NSF/AFOSR EFRI 2-DARE grant number #EFMA1433459. References [1] Dan Liu and David Tománek, Effect of Net Charge on the Relative Stability of 2D Boron Allotropes, Nano Lett. 19, 1359-1365 (2019). [2] Xianqing Lin and David Tománek, Minimum model for the electronic structure of twisted bilayer graphene and related structures, Phys. Rev. B. 98, 081410(R) (2018). [3] Xianqing Lin, Dan Liu and David Tománek, Shear instability in twisted bilayer graphene, Phys. Rev. B. 98, 195432 (2018). Figure 1: (a) Card magic illustrating the van der Waals assembly of 2D materials to a functional nanostructure. (b) Conversion of a 2D boron monolayer to a honeycomb lattice due to electron doping provided by a 2D electride. (c) Unusual changes in the electronic structure of twisted bilayer graphene near the magic twist angle θm≈1.08°. Bio: David Tománek studied Physics in Switzerland and received his Ph.D. from the Free University in Berlin. While holding a position as Assistant Professor of Physics in Berlin, he got engaged in theoretical research in Nanostructures at the AT&T Bell Laboratories and the University of California at Berkeley. He established the field of Computational Nanotechnology at Michigan State University, where he holds a position as Full Professor of Physics. His scientific expertise lies in the development and application of numerical techniques for structural, electronic and optical properties of surfaces, low dimensional systems and nanostructures. Since he was working on his PhD Thesis, he promoted the use of computer simulations to understand atomic-level processes at surfaces and in atomic clusters. Witnessed in several hundred publications and invited talks are his results on the electronic structure, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties, as well as quantum conductance of nanostructures. His contributions to Computational Nanotechnology, in particular in the field of fullerenes and nanotubes, have been rewarded by a Fellowship of the American Physical Society, the Alexander-von-Humboldt Foundation Distinguished Senior Scientist Award and the Japan Carbon Award for Life-Time Achievement. Event Location: Zoom link in description