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September

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: John Baez (UC Riverside)

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It came as a shock when I first realized that some of the most famous equations in thermodynamics are just the same as the most famous equations in classical mechanics - with only the names of the variables changed.  It turns out that this follows from a deep and not yet thoroughly studied analogy between the two subjects, which I will explain. 

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-23T16:00:00 2021-09-23T17:00:00 Classical Mechanics versus Thermodynamics It came as a shock when I first realized that some of the most famous equations in thermodynamics are just the same as the most famous equations in classical mechanics - with only the names of the variables changed.  It turns out that this follows from a deep and not yet thoroughly studied analogy between the two subjects, which I will explain.  Event Location: Connect via zoom

September

| Event Location: Zoom link in description | Speaker: Jason Alicea - Caltech

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-23T10:00:00 2021-09-23T11:00:00 Internally engineered Majorana modes in twisted bilayer graphene https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66879995529?pwd=dHpQb25LSGVZK3ozY243em5tenRWQT09 Meeting ID: 668 7999 5529 Passcode: 113399 Event Location: Zoom link in description

September

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Ruobing Dong (UVic)

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Planets form in gaseous protoplanetary disks surrounding newborn stars. As such, the most direct way to learn how they form from observations, is to observe them forming in disks. In the past, this was difficult due to a lack of observational capabilities, and planet formation was a subject of theoretical research.

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-20T15:00:00 2021-09-20T16:00:00 Observational Planet Formation Planets form in gaseous protoplanetary disks surrounding newborn stars. As such, the most direct way to learn how they form from observations, is to observe them forming in disks. In the past, this was difficult due to a lack of observational capabilities, and planet formation was a subject of theoretical research. Event Location: Connect via zoom

September

| Event Location: Hennings 201 (or via zoom) | Speaker: Faculty members

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Research group presentations:

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-16T16:00:00 2021-09-16T17:00:00 Overview of Physics & Astronomy Research Groups at UBC Research group presentations: Event Location: Hennings 201 (or via zoom)

September

| Event Location: Zoom link in description | Speaker: Prineha Narang, Harvard University

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-16T10:00:00 2021-09-16T11:00:00 CM Seminar: Controlling Emergent Behavior in Quantum Matter from a Theory Perspective https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66879995529?pwd=dHpQb25LSGVZK3ozY243em5tenRWQT09 Meeting ID: 668 7999 5529 Passcode: 113399 Event Location: Zoom link in description

September

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Aaron Boley (UBC)

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The rapid development of low Earth orbit (LEO) is being done without due regard for the long-term preservation of LEO or humanity's connection with the cosmos. In particular, large constellations of satellites, i.e., so-called mega-constellations or satcons, have the potential to severely interfere with the use and exploration of space by numerous other actors. This includes interference with astronomy and stargazing through light and spectrum pollution. Satcon development also might have non-trivial environmental impacts on Earth's atmosphere.

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-13T15:00:00 2021-09-13T16:00:00 Mega-Constellations and Astronomers: Updates on SATCON2 and IAU Dark and Quiet Skies The rapid development of low Earth orbit (LEO) is being done without due regard for the long-term preservation of LEO or humanity's connection with the cosmos. In particular, large constellations of satellites, i.e., so-called mega-constellations or satcons, have the potential to severely interfere with the use and exploration of space by numerous other actors. This includes interference with astronomy and stargazing through light and spectrum pollution. Satcon development also might have non-trivial environmental impacts on Earth's atmosphere. Event Location: Connect via zoom

September

| Event Location: online |

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The department will be hosting an Imagine Day session for undergraduate students. PHAS academic advisors will introduce PHAS undergrad programs and share tips for planning your academic schedule and seeking job/research opportunities. PHAS alumni will share experiences from student clubs. The event will end with a live Q&A session with PHAS advisors.

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Add to Calendar 2021-09-07T11:00:00 2021-09-07T11:45:00 PHAS Imagine Day Event 2021 The department will be hosting an Imagine Day session for undergraduate students. PHAS academic advisors will introduce PHAS undergrad programs and share tips for planning your academic schedule and seeking job/research opportunities. PHAS alumni will share experiences from student clubs. The event will end with a live Q&A session with PHAS advisors. Event Location: online

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Caleb Lammers + Justin Lawrence + Erik Gillis

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Caleb Lammers: "Candidate High-Redshift Protoclusters and Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies in the Planck High-z Catalogue"

Justin Lawrence: "Dark matter search limits and sensitivities with extragalactic dark matter components"

Erik Gillis: "An RRAT Census with CHIME/PULSAR"

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-30T15:00:00 2021-08-30T16:00:00 Even more student presentations Caleb Lammers: "Candidate High-Redshift Protoclusters and Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies in the Planck High-z Catalogue" Justin Lawrence: "Dark matter search limits and sensitivities with extragalactic dark matter components" Erik Gillis: "An RRAT Census with CHIME/PULSAR" Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Youtube

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It's the end of the summer, so let's have a completely informal meeting this week!

For the last colloquium slot before term starts, we'll have a discussion around some physics-related content from youtube and other video sources.  Some of our regular attendees have shared suggestions for amusing and/or informative bits of physics video, which we'll show.  If your favourite science clip isn't included, perhaps there will be time for additional examples at the end.

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-26T16:00:00 2021-08-26T17:00:00 Fun Fysics Films It's the end of the summer, so let's have a completely informal meeting this week! For the last colloquium slot before term starts, we'll have a discussion around some physics-related content from youtube and other video sources.  Some of our regular attendees have shared suggestions for amusing and/or informative bits of physics video, which we'll show.  If your favourite science clip isn't included, perhaps there will be time for additional examples at the end. Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Keshav Gopinath, Timothy Yu and Hao Tse Huang

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Keshav Gopinath: "MUSE Spectrograph and the analysis of a candidate group with a lensed quiescent galaxy"

Timothy Yu: "The Study of Molecular Gas Content of Massive Quiescent Galaxies at z~2"

Hao Tse (Howard) Huang: "Multi-tracer investigation of molecular gas in a massive radio galaxy"

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-23T15:00:00 2021-08-23T16:00:00 More student presentations Keshav Gopinath: "MUSE Spectrograph and the analysis of a candidate group with a lensed quiescent galaxy" Timothy Yu: "The Study of Molecular Gas Content of Massive Quiescent Galaxies at z~2" Hao Tse (Howard) Huang: "Multi-tracer investigation of molecular gas in a massive radio galaxy" Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Ilya Sh. Averbukh (Weizmann Institute)

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Echoes are common in many areas of physics, including NMR, plasma physics, nonlinear optics, cavity quantum electrodynamics, cold atoms physics, and dynamics of proton storage rings.  Recently, we theoretically found (probably) the simplest classical system featuring the echo phenomenon — a collection of randomly oriented free rotors with dispersed rotational velocities.

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-19T16:00:00 2021-08-19T17:00:00 Echoes Made Simple Echoes are common in many areas of physics, including NMR, plasma physics, nonlinear optics, cavity quantum electrodynamics, cold atoms physics, and dynamics of proton storage rings.  Recently, we theoretically found (probably) the simplest classical system featuring the echo phenomenon — a collection of randomly oriented free rotors with dispersed rotational velocities. Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Dominic Walliman

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In this talk Dr Walliman shows how he uses graphics, illustration and animation to explain science on his popular YouTube channel Domain of Science. He explains his approach to science communication and his focus on context setting. For a case study he looks at the field of physics at three levels: the whole field, expanding in on quantum physics and finally looking at the fundamental particles of the standard model of particle physics.

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-12T16:00:00 2021-08-12T17:00:00 Explaining Science Visually Using Graphics and YouTube In this talk Dr Walliman shows how he uses graphics, illustration and animation to explain science on his popular YouTube channel Domain of Science. He explains his approach to science communication and his focus on context setting. For a case study he looks at the field of physics at three levels: the whole field, expanding in on quantum physics and finally looking at the fundamental particles of the standard model of particle physics. Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Suresh Sivanandam (UofT)

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Optical integral field (imaging) spectroscopic surveys of large numbers of galaxies are now becoming the norm. These surveys allow detailed studies of individual galaxies, which include their stellar/gas kinematics and stellar populations. With a sufficiently large sample, these types of observations are the best tools for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. However, similar surveys in the infrared remain challenging.

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-09T15:00:00 2021-08-09T16:00:00 Enabling Infrared Surveys of Galaxies with Innovative Imaging Spectrographs Optical integral field (imaging) spectroscopic surveys of large numbers of galaxies are now becoming the norm. These surveys allow detailed studies of individual galaxies, which include their stellar/gas kinematics and stellar populations. With a sufficiently large sample, these types of observations are the best tools for understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. However, similar surveys in the infrared remain challenging. Event Location: Connect via zoom

August

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Richard Arnold (Victoria University of Wellington)

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If an object is symmetric, then there are numerous equivalent ways to describe its orientation in space.  For example, the lattice of a crystal with cubic symmetry can be mapped onto itself by 24 rotations.   The statistics of the orientations of such objects, even exercises as simple as finding the average orientation, are made complicated by these symmetries.

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Add to Calendar 2021-08-05T16:00:00 2021-08-05T17:00:00 Statistics of Ambiguous Rotations If an object is symmetric, then there are numerous equivalent ways to describe its orientation in space.  For example, the lattice of a crystal with cubic symmetry can be mapped onto itself by 24 rotations.   The statistics of the orientations of such objects, even exercises as simple as finding the average orientation, are made complicated by these symmetries. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Chris Rodell (UBC EOAS)

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In late June 2021, the Pacific Northwest experienced extraordinarily high temperatures. British Columbia alone recorded over 60 record high temperatures, with the town of Lytton setting an all-time high temperature in Canada for three consecutive days, peaking at 49.6 C (121.3 F). During this talk, we will explore the meteorological conditions that led to these extreme temperatures—analyzing the upper air dynamics, mid-level thermal anomalies, and terrain effects during the event. We will also delve into the societal and environmental impacts regionally.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-29T16:00:00 2021-07-29T17:00:00 Heatwave: A Synoptic Breakdown Of The Extraordinary Heatwave On The Pacific Coast Of The US And Canada in June 2021 In late June 2021, the Pacific Northwest experienced extraordinarily high temperatures. British Columbia alone recorded over 60 record high temperatures, with the town of Lytton setting an all-time high temperature in Canada for three consecutive days, peaking at 49.6 C (121.3 F). During this talk, we will explore the meteorological conditions that led to these extreme temperatures—analyzing the upper air dynamics, mid-level thermal anomalies, and terrain effects during the event. We will also delve into the societal and environmental impacts regionally. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Chiaki Kobayashi (University of Hertfordshire)

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Metallicities and elemental abundances are key to testing our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. At the beginning of the universe only light elements such as hydrogen and helium were produced. Carbon and heavier elements were instead created inside stars and distributed into the interstellar medium by stellar winds and supernova explosions. From the spatial distribution of elements in stars and gas, it is therefore possible to constrain the star formation and chemical enrichment histories of galaxies.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-28T10:00:00 2021-07-28T11:00:00 Chemodynamical evolution of galaxies Metallicities and elemental abundances are key to testing our current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. At the beginning of the universe only light elements such as hydrogen and helium were produced. Carbon and heavier elements were instead created inside stars and distributed into the interstellar medium by stellar winds and supernova explosions. From the spatial distribution of elements in stars and gas, it is therefore possible to constrain the star formation and chemical enrichment histories of galaxies. Event Location: Online

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Alysa Obertas (UofT)

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The Kepler telescope detected thousands of exoplanets in hundreds of multi-planet systems and revolutionised planetary sciences. Many of these systems are quite compact and are typically a few billions of years old. Consequently, we are seeing only a snapshot of system architectures after hundreds of billions or even trillions of orbits. A substantial portion of their evolution has been governed by dynamical interactions, however. This can allow us to probe their histories and constrain the role of the natal environment.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-26T15:00:00 2021-07-26T16:00:00 The Dynamics of Compact, Multi-planet Systems The Kepler telescope detected thousands of exoplanets in hundreds of multi-planet systems and revolutionised planetary sciences. Many of these systems are quite compact and are typically a few billions of years old. Consequently, we are seeing only a snapshot of system architectures after hundreds of billions or even trillions of orbits. A substantial portion of their evolution has been governed by dynamical interactions, however. This can allow us to probe their histories and constrain the role of the natal environment. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Philip Stamp (zoom)

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It has long been assumed that gravity and quantum mechanics can only be confronted at very high energies ~ 1.2 x 10^28 eV (enough to boil 5 tons of water, and 15 orders of magnitude above the range of particle accelerators). However, recent theory indicates that gravity may cause a breakdown of quantum mechanics at much lower energies, for large masses. This has led to a new experimental field in which such a breakdown is sought in earth-based labs.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-22T16:00:00 2021-07-22T17:00:00 Quantum Gravity in the Lab It has long been assumed that gravity and quantum mechanics can only be confronted at very high energies ~ 1.2 x 10^28 eV (enough to boil 5 tons of water, and 15 orders of magnitude above the range of particle accelerators). However, recent theory indicates that gravity may cause a breakdown of quantum mechanics at much lower energies, for large masses. This has led to a new experimental field in which such a breakdown is sought in earth-based labs. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Sandro Tacchella (Harvard / UNIST)

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How and why galaxies grow in stellar mass and cease their star formation are key open questions of galaxy formation and evolution. I present evidence for a diversity of pathways for building up the quiescent galaxy population at early cosmic times. Specifically, I will present observational constraints on star-formation histories and quenching timescales by combining Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic data with >10-band photometry.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-21T15:00:00 2021-07-21T16:00:00 Quenching massive galaxies How and why galaxies grow in stellar mass and cease their star formation are key open questions of galaxy formation and evolution. I present evidence for a diversity of pathways for building up the quiescent galaxy population at early cosmic times. Specifically, I will present observational constraints on star-formation histories and quenching timescales by combining Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic data with >10-band photometry. Event Location: Online

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Ilaria Caiazzo (Caltech)

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The advent of Gaia and of large photometric and spectroscopic surveys is changing the landscape of white dwarf studies. These incredible new data sets, together with improved models, have enabled tackling some unsolved mysteries concerning white dwarfs as a population, as well as discovering extremely peculiar objects that challenge our understanding of white dwarf formation and evolution.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-19T15:00:00 2021-07-19T16:00:00 Small But Mighty: The Tiniest White Dwarf and Other Stories The advent of Gaia and of large photometric and spectroscopic surveys is changing the landscape of white dwarf studies. These incredible new data sets, together with improved models, have enabled tackling some unsolved mysteries concerning white dwarfs as a population, as well as discovering extremely peculiar objects that challenge our understanding of white dwarf formation and evolution. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Wendy Freedman (U Chicago)

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An important and unresolved question in cosmology today is whether there is new physics that is missing from our current standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) model.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-15T16:00:00 2021-07-15T17:00:00 Increasing Accuracy in the Hubble Constant: Consistency with LCDM An important and unresolved question in cosmology today is whether there is new physics that is missing from our current standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) model. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: via ZOOM | Speaker: CAROLIN HOFER

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Abstract:
The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a drift-scan radio telescope designed to map large scale structure in the universe using the redshifted 21 cm line emitted by neutral hydrogen. By observing the 400 to 800 MHz frequency band, CHIME will measure the expansion rate of the universe in the redshift range z = 0.8 - 2.5 to constrain the nature of dark energy.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-15T13:00:00 2021-07-15T15:00:00 Departmental Doctoral Oral Examination (Thesis Title: “The effects of calibration errors and foreground filters on the CHIME power spectrum measurement. A study with simulations and real data.”) Abstract: The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a drift-scan radio telescope designed to map large scale structure in the universe using the redshifted 21 cm line emitted by neutral hydrogen. By observing the 400 to 800 MHz frequency band, CHIME will measure the expansion rate of the universe in the redshift range z = 0.8 - 2.5 to constrain the nature of dark energy. Event Location: via ZOOM

July

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Jenny Greene (Princeton University)

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Because they are dark-matter dominated, dwarf galaxies provide some of the most stringent tests of our cold dark matter model. Specifically, Lambda CDM makes predictions about the number, shape, and spatial distributions of the faint friends of massive galaxies. I will present results from the Exploration of Local VolumE Satellites (ELVES) survey, that constructs the largest sample of satellites around Milky Way-like hosts.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-14T10:00:00 2021-07-14T11:00:00 Dwarf Galaxies and Their Black Holes Because they are dark-matter dominated, dwarf galaxies provide some of the most stringent tests of our cold dark matter model. Specifically, Lambda CDM makes predictions about the number, shape, and spatial distributions of the faint friends of massive galaxies. I will present results from the Exploration of Local VolumE Satellites (ELVES) survey, that constructs the largest sample of satellites around Milky Way-like hosts. Event Location: Online

July

| Event Location: via ZOOM | Speaker: JONATHAN MASSEY-ALLARD

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Abstract:

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-14T09:00:00 2021-07-14T11:00:00 Departmental Doctoral Oral Examination (Thesis Title: “Learning Physics with Interactive Simulations: Inductive Inquiry Learning Activities for an Introductory Electromagnetism Course”) Abstract: Event Location: via ZOOM

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Anna Sajina (Tufts)

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A key open question in extragalactic astronomy is understanding the processes driving the build-up and quenching of massive galaxies — specifically the role of AGN and environment therein.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-12T15:00:00 2021-07-12T16:00:00 Galaxies, AGN and their environments A key open question in extragalactic astronomy is understanding the processes driving the build-up and quenching of massive galaxies — specifically the role of AGN and environment therein. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Virtual | Speaker: Dr. Renée Hložek

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The Equity & Inclusion in PHAS team presents “Impostor Syndrome,” a workshop run by astrophysicist Dr. Renée Hložek.

Navigating the academic environment can be stressful. Power dynamics can impact our ability to communicate clearly with each other, and can generate feelings of impostor syndrome. In this interactive workshop, we will use techniques of improvisation and changing power dynamics to explore ways we can shape our communication environment.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-09T10:00:00 2021-07-09T12:00:00 Impostor Syndrome Workshop The Equity & Inclusion in PHAS team presents “Impostor Syndrome,” a workshop run by astrophysicist Dr. Renée Hložek. Navigating the academic environment can be stressful. Power dynamics can impact our ability to communicate clearly with each other, and can generate feelings of impostor syndrome. In this interactive workshop, we will use techniques of improvisation and changing power dynamics to explore ways we can shape our communication environment. Event Location: Virtual

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Richard Magin (UIC)

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Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Depicts Regions of Sub- and Super-diffusion Encoded by the Fractional Diffusion Equation

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-08T16:00:00 2021-07-08T17:00:00 Fractional derivatives and applications in MRI Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Depicts Regions of Sub- and Super-diffusion Encoded by the Fractional Diffusion Equation Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: Connect via Zoom | Speaker: Renata Kallosh (Stanford)

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We perform covariant quantization of Einstein gravity in spherical harmonic basis in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We use Regge-Wheeler gauge for modes with l>=2, and propose the gauge for l<2 modes.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-07T11:00:00 2021-07-07T12:00:00 Quantization of Gravity in the Black Hole Background We perform covariant quantization of Einstein gravity in spherical harmonic basis in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. We use Regge-Wheeler gauge for modes with l&gt;=2, and propose the gauge for l&lt;2 modes. Event Location: Connect via Zoom

July

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Chiara Circosta (University College London)

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Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to be key in shaping the life-cycle of host galaxies. AGN inject a significant amount of energy into the surrounding interstellar medium and launch gaseous winds. They are therefore able to potentially suppress or inhibit future star formation in their hosts. An ideal cosmic laboratory to study how AGN regulate galaxy growth is the so-called cosmic noon (z~2), i.e. the peak of AGN accretion activity when their energy output is overall maximized.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-07T10:00:00 2021-07-07T11:00:00 Looking for observational signatures of feedback from active galactic nuclei Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to be key in shaping the life-cycle of host galaxies. AGN inject a significant amount of energy into the surrounding interstellar medium and launch gaseous winds. They are therefore able to potentially suppress or inhibit future star formation in their hosts. An ideal cosmic laboratory to study how AGN regulate galaxy growth is the so-called cosmic noon (z~2), i.e. the peak of AGN accretion activity when their energy output is overall maximized. Event Location: Online

July

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Gioia Rau (GSFC)

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Multi-wavelength observations, from the ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR) and beyond, are powerful tools for exploring evolved stars and characterizing exoplanets. Cool evolved stars contribute significantly to the interstellar medium (ISM) enrichment, via gas and dust produced in their atmospheres. Yet, a thorough understanding of their mass loss mechanism(s) remains challenging. Exploring cool evolved stars' upper layers is thus essential to unraveling their mass loss history and its influence on the composition of the ISM and Galactic ecology.

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-05T15:00:00 2021-07-05T16:00:00 Multi-wavelength Explorations of Evolved Stars and Exoplanets Multi-wavelength observations, from the ultraviolet (UV) to the infrared (IR) and beyond, are powerful tools for exploring evolved stars and characterizing exoplanets. Cool evolved stars contribute significantly to the interstellar medium (ISM) enrichment, via gas and dust produced in their atmospheres. Yet, a thorough understanding of their mass loss mechanism(s) remains challenging. Exploring cool evolved stars' upper layers is thus essential to unraveling their mass loss history and its influence on the composition of the ISM and Galactic ecology. Event Location: Connect via zoom

July

| Event Location: None | Speaker: None

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It's Canada Day and we're not having a Departmental Colloquium!

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Add to Calendar 2021-07-01T16:00:00 2021-07-01T17:00:00 Canada Day! It's Canada Day and we're not having a Departmental Colloquium! Event Location: None

June

| Event Location: Connect via Zoom | Speaker: Brittany Kamai (Caltech and UC Santa Cruz)

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We are living in an astrophysics transformation because decades ago technologists started to design and build our future.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-30T11:00:00 2021-06-30T12:00:00 How do we design the future of gravitational wave astrophysics? We are living in an astrophysics transformation because decades ago technologists started to design and build our future. Event Location: Connect via Zoom

June

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Nir Mandelker (KITP, UCSB)

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Massive star-forming galaxies and proto-clusters at high redshift, z>2, are thought to be fed by narrow streams of cold, ~10^4K, gas from cosmic web filaments. However, the interaction of these cold streams with the ambient hot CGM is poorly understood. In particular, the observational signatures of this interaction and of cold streams more broadly, the thermal and morphological state of the gas that eventually reaches the central galaxy, and its effect on galaxy evolution, are all open questions.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-30T10:00:00 2021-06-30T11:00:00 The evolution of cold accretion flows in the CGM of massive galaxies and proto-clusters at z>2 Massive star-forming galaxies and proto-clusters at high redshift, z&gt;2, are thought to be fed by narrow streams of cold, ~10^4K, gas from cosmic web filaments. However, the interaction of these cold streams with the ambient hot CGM is poorly understood. In particular, the observational signatures of this interaction and of cold streams more broadly, the thermal and morphological state of the gas that eventually reaches the central galaxy, and its effect on galaxy evolution, are all open questions. Event Location: Online

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Adam Dong, Bradley Meyers and Ingrid Stairs

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The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity-Mapping Experiment (CHIME) opens a whole new window on the Universe and this new catalogue of more than 500 fast radio bursts (FRBs) provides a treasure trove of data for understaning FRBs. For the first time, we can study a population of FRBs from a single telescope. We see that they come from all over the sky and across the Universe, from very nearby galaxies to more than halfway back to the Big Bang. We also see that there may be more than one type of FRB.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-28T15:00:00 2021-06-28T16:00:00 The first CHIME/FRB catalogue and beyond The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity-Mapping Experiment (CHIME) opens a whole new window on the Universe and this new catalogue of more than 500 fast radio bursts (FRBs) provides a treasure trove of data for understaning FRBs. For the first time, we can study a population of FRBs from a single telescope. We see that they come from all over the sky and across the Universe, from very nearby galaxies to more than halfway back to the Big Bang. We also see that there may be more than one type of FRB. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Michael Zemcov (RIT)

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Observational astrophysics is often driven by the desire for ever increasing angular resolution, which has resulted in larger and more expensive telescopes with time. However, telescopes with very small apertures can sometimes perform cosmological measurements as important as their larger siblings. In this talk, I will present several examples of small aperture, space-based experiments providing unique views of the large scale structure of the Universe as traced at optical and infrared wavelengths.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-24T16:00:00 2021-06-24T17:00:00 Measuring the Largest Structures in the Universe with the Smallest Telescopes in Space Observational astrophysics is often driven by the desire for ever increasing angular resolution, which has resulted in larger and more expensive telescopes with time. However, telescopes with very small apertures can sometimes perform cosmological measurements as important as their larger siblings. In this talk, I will present several examples of small aperture, space-based experiments providing unique views of the large scale structure of the Universe as traced at optical and infrared wavelengths. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Alice Shapley (UCLA)

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-23T10:00:00 2021-06-23T11:00:00 The Search for Ionizing Radiation at High Redshift /*--&gt;*/ /*--&gt;*/ Event Location: Online

June

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Claudia Cicone (University of Oslo)

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The circumgalactic medium (CGM) represents the boundary between the interstellar medium and the cosmic web, and its properties are directly shaped by the baryon cycle in galaxies. The CGM was traditionally believed to consist mostly of warm and hot gas, but recent breakthroughs have presented a new scenario according to which an important fraction of its mass may reside in an "hidden" cold atomic and molecular phase.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-18T10:00:00 2021-06-18T11:00:00 The hidden cold circumgalactic medium The circumgalactic medium (CGM) represents the boundary between the interstellar medium and the cosmic web, and its properties are directly shaped by the baryon cycle in galaxies. The CGM was traditionally believed to consist mostly of warm and hot gas, but recent breakthroughs have presented a new scenario according to which an important fraction of its mass may reside in an "hidden" cold atomic and molecular phase. Event Location: Online

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Peter Mohr (NIST)

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The International System of Units (SI) underwent a revolutionary change on May 20, 2019. In October 2017, the International Committee on Weights and Measures met at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris and recommended a new definition of the SI such that a particular set of constants would have certain values when expressed in the new SI units. In particular, the SI is now defined by the statement:

The International System of Units, the SI, is the system of units in which

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-17T16:00:00 2021-06-17T17:00:00 The new SI and fundamental constants The International System of Units (SI) underwent a revolutionary change on May 20, 2019. In October 2017, the International Committee on Weights and Measures met at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures near Paris and recommended a new definition of the SI such that a particular set of constants would have certain values when expressed in the new SI units. In particular, the SI is now defined by the statement: The International System of Units, the SI, is the system of units in which Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Kartheik Iyer (Dunlap, UofT)

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A diverse range of physical processes are responsible for regulating star formation across galaxies. Understanding their relative contributions to galaxy growth and quenching at different epochs is one of the key questions in galaxy evolution today. Since the processes driving galaxy growth, quenching and morphological transformations are thought to have characteristic timescales, studying the strength of stochastic star formation rate (SFR) fluctuations on these timescales allows us to disentangle their relative contributions for a population of galaxies.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-14T15:00:00 2021-06-14T16:00:00 Constraining the Timescales of Galaxy Evolution using Observations and Simulations A diverse range of physical processes are responsible for regulating star formation across galaxies. Understanding their relative contributions to galaxy growth and quenching at different epochs is one of the key questions in galaxy evolution today. Since the processes driving galaxy growth, quenching and morphological transformations are thought to have characteristic timescales, studying the strength of stochastic star formation rate (SFR) fluctuations on these timescales allows us to disentangle their relative contributions for a population of galaxies. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Dean Karlen (UVic)

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COVID-19 spreads quickly, with different regions experiencing waves of infections at different times. While the initial waves reflected changes in social behaviour, the most recent waves in Canada and elsewhere were influenced by variants and vaccination. This talk introduces basic epidemic modelling and presents analyses of data from BC and around the world that show how variants and vaccination affected the past and will shape the future of the pandemic.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-10T16:00:00 2021-06-10T17:00:00 Modelling COVID-19 variants and vaccination COVID-19 spreads quickly, with different regions experiencing waves of infections at different times. While the initial waves reflected changes in social behaviour, the most recent waves in Canada and elsewhere were influenced by variants and vaccination. This talk introduces basic epidemic modelling and presents analyses of data from BC and around the world that show how variants and vaccination affected the past and will shape the future of the pandemic. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Samir Salim (Indiana University)

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TBA

"2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-09T10:00:00 2021-06-09T11:00:00 AGN emission line diagnostic diagrams TBA "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Ben Pearce (McMaster)

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What is the origin of the building blocks of life on early Earth? Is it necessary that they were delivered by meteorites or interplanetary dust? Or was early Earth "biogenic," and could produce key biomolecules on its own? An atmosphere rich in HCN is a distinguishing feature of what we term biogenic worlds. HCN is a key species produced in Miller-Urey electric discharge experiments simulating lightning-based chemistry in the primordial atmosphere. HCN reacts in water to form nucleobases and ribose, the building blocks of RNA, and amino acids, the building blocks of proteins.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-07T15:00:00 2021-06-07T16:00:00 Biogenic Worlds: From atmospheric HCN production to the building blocks of RNA in warm little ponds What is the origin of the building blocks of life on early Earth? Is it necessary that they were delivered by meteorites or interplanetary dust? Or was early Earth "biogenic," and could produce key biomolecules on its own? An atmosphere rich in HCN is a distinguishing feature of what we term biogenic worlds. HCN is a key species produced in Miller-Urey electric discharge experiments simulating lightning-based chemistry in the primordial atmosphere. HCN reacts in water to form nucleobases and ribose, the building blocks of RNA, and amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Sidney Nagel (U Chicago)

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It is a well-known and indisputable fact that materials age and deform over time, which often leads to detrimental degradation.  In contrast to this view, I will seek to embrace aging and develop it as a methodology to create desired and novel functionality in matter. The central idea is that a material retains a memory of the external stimuli to which it was exposed during its preparation history and, in reaction to those applied cues, can be directed to evolve desired behaviors not easily found otherwise.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-03T16:00:00 2021-06-03T17:00:00 Directed Aging: Using Memory and Nature's Greed as a New Principle for Materials Design It is a well-known and indisputable fact that materials age and deform over time, which often leads to detrimental degradation.  In contrast to this view, I will seek to embrace aging and develop it as a methodology to create desired and novel functionality in matter. The central idea is that a material retains a memory of the external stimuli to which it was exposed during its preparation history and, in reaction to those applied cues, can be directed to evolve desired behaviors not easily found otherwise. Event Location: Connect via zoom

June

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Jinyi Shangguan (Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics)

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TBA

"2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars.

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Add to Calendar 2021-06-02T10:00:00 2021-06-02T11:00:00 Science of VLTI/GRAVITY near-infrared interferometer and the studies of luminous AGNs TBA "2021 BC Galaxy Summer Seminars" is an online seminar series organized jointly by SFU, UBC and UVic. For the full series schedule, visit the series webpage. Subscribe to our e-mail list here to get reminders about these seminars. Event Location: Online

May

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Jean-Luc Margot (UCLA)

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Earth-based radar observations in 2006–2020 enabled the first measurement of the spin precession rate and moment of inertia of Venus.  The observations also showed that the spin period of the solid planet changes by tens of minutes.  The length-of-day variations are due to variations in atmospheric angular momentum transferred to the solid planet.  Some of the variations appear to follow the diurnal cycle.

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-31T15:00:00 2021-05-31T16:00:00 Spin state and moment of inertia of Venus Earth-based radar observations in 2006–2020 enabled the first measurement of the spin precession rate and moment of inertia of Venus.  The observations also showed that the spin period of the solid planet changes by tens of minutes.  The length-of-day variations are due to variations in atmospheric angular momentum transferred to the solid planet.  Some of the variations appear to follow the diurnal cycle. Event Location: Connect via zoom

May

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Pieter Cullis (UBC)

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I graduated from the UBC Physics Department with a PhD in solid state physics in 1972. In this talk I will relate an improbable journey from ESR studies of phosphorus-doped silicon at 4°K to enabling the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine. The story begins with a move to the Biochemistry Department at Oxford University as a Postdoctoral Fellow to use NMR to study the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes. This required the use of simplified “model membrane” vesicular systems consisting of well-defined lipid species.

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-27T16:00:00 2021-05-27T17:00:00 Adventures of a lapsed physicist: from solid state physics to Covid-19 vaccines I graduated from the UBC Physics Department with a PhD in solid state physics in 1972. In this talk I will relate an improbable journey from ESR studies of phosphorus-doped silicon at 4°K to enabling the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine. The story begins with a move to the Biochemistry Department at Oxford University as a Postdoctoral Fellow to use NMR to study the functional roles of lipids in biological membranes. This required the use of simplified “model membrane” vesicular systems consisting of well-defined lipid species. Event Location: Connect via zoom

May

| Event Location: Zoom link in description | Speaker: David Tománek, Michigan State University

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-26T15:00:00 2021-05-26T16:00:00 Special CM Seminar - Magic behavior of low-dimensional nanostructures https://ubc.zoom.us/j/66400573212?pwd=U2txNjdnazcrMjJ4L2FZMWtXOFc2dz09 Meeting ID: 664 0057 3212 Passcode: 139139 Event Location: Zoom link in description

May

| Event Location: Online | Speaker: Eric Bell (University of Michigan)

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Large, disk-dominated galaxies like the Milky Way live in the center of vast ecosystems - dark matter, circumgalactic gas, and satellite galaxies. This ecosystem and the large galaxies in them grow hierarchically through merging. Yet, in our pictures of the evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way and the study of their satellites as probes of dark matter and small-scale cosmology merging generally plays a peripheral role. What do the mergers of these ecosystems and the galaxies in them do to galaxies like our own?

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-26T10:00:00 2021-05-26T11:00:00 Islands no more: how do mergers affect galaxies and their satellites? Large, disk-dominated galaxies like the Milky Way live in the center of vast ecosystems - dark matter, circumgalactic gas, and satellite galaxies. This ecosystem and the large galaxies in them grow hierarchically through merging. Yet, in our pictures of the evolution of galaxies like the Milky Way and the study of their satellites as probes of dark matter and small-scale cosmology merging generally plays a peripheral role. What do the mergers of these ecosystems and the galaxies in them do to galaxies like our own? Event Location: Online

May

| Event Location: via Zoom | Speaker: DEBORAH GOOD

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Abstract:
The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a transit telescope located at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in Kaleden, BC.  Though initially designed to map redshifted neutral hydrogen and constrain dark energy, it also supports several commensal science projects. This thesis focuses on work conducted with the CHIME/FRB fast radio burst searching backend and the CHIME/Pulsar pulsar timing backend.

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-25T13:00:00 2021-05-25T15:00:00 Departmental Doctoral Oral Examination (Thesis Title: “Timing Pulsars and Detecting Radio Transients with CHIME”) Abstract: The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is a transit telescope located at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in Kaleden, BC.  Though initially designed to map redshifted neutral hydrogen and constrain dark energy, it also supports several commensal science projects. This thesis focuses on work conducted with the CHIME/FRB fast radio burst searching backend and the CHIME/Pulsar pulsar timing backend. Event Location: via Zoom

May

| Event Location: Connect via zoom | Speaker: Brent Seales (U Kentucky)

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Abstract

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Add to Calendar 2021-05-20T16:00:00 2021-05-20T17:00:00 Reading the Invisible Library: Virtual Unwrapping and the Scroll from En-Gedi Abstract Event Location: Connect via zoom